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Bhutan & Nepal Tour

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Tours

Bhutan & Nepal Tour

Home to Mount Everest and the bustling city of Kathmandu, Nepal is a country rich in festivity and tradition. Nearby, known as the Land of Dragons, you will find the isolated country of Bhutan the sole-surviving Himalayan Buddhist Kingdom. But there is more to these two nations than bright traditional dress, vibrant festivals and rugged natural beauty. Here’s out list of ten fascinating things you might not have known about Nepal and Bhutan.

If you’re the kind of traveller who goes in search of Unesco World Heritage Sites, then Nepal is a treasure trove. The country boasts the densest collection of notable cultural and natural sites, ten, and you’ll find seven of them in Kathmandu Valley alone. Among the cultural sites are Kathmandu Durbar Square, Swayambhunath and Changunarayan temple. Chitwan National Park and Sagarmatha National Park are Nepal’s natural sites.

Nepal may be small, but within its borders you’ll find over 80 ethnic groups speaking a staggering 124 languages. The diversity of its population, makes the country a fascinating place to visit. Having evolved over centuries the cultural heritage of Nepal is rich and representative of its diverse citizens. Its dance, music, art, folklore, literature and food are also influenced by Indian, Mongolian and Tibetan culture.

Bhutan, the land of the Thunder Dragon. A mesmerising place in the clouds, with lush valleys, tiered rice paddy fields, rich forests and rushing rivers. A place that measures the success of the country, not on outputs or financials, but on the Gross National Happiness of the people who live there. A trip to Bhutan is an eye-opening, life changing experience.  

So often it’s wealth that defines whether a country is deemed “successful” or not, but in Bhutan, the government is guided by the philosophy of Gross National Happiness. The concept of measuring the happiness and well-being of citizens was brought to the fore by former king Jigme Singye Wangchuck in 1972. He is reported to have said: “Gross National Happiness is more important than Gross National Product.”

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Home to Mount Everest and the bustling city of Kathmandu, Nepal is a country rich in festivity and tradition. Nearby, known as the Land of Dragons, you will find the isolated country of Bhutan the sole-surviving Himalayan Buddhist Kingdom. But there is more to these two nations than bright traditional dress, vibrant festivals and rugged natural beauty. Here’s out list of ten fascinating things you might not have known about Nepal and Bhutan.

If you’re the kind of traveller who goes in search of Unesco World Heritage Sites, then Nepal is a treasure trove. The country boasts the densest collection of notable cultural and natural sites, ten, and you’ll find seven of them in Kathmandu Valley alone. Among the cultural sites are Kathmandu Durbar Square, Swayambhunath and Changunarayan temple. Chitwan National Park and Sagarmatha National Park are Nepal’s natural sites.

Nepal may be small, but within its borders you’ll find over 80 ethnic groups speaking a staggering 124 languages. The diversity of its population, makes the country a fascinating place to visit. Having evolved over centuries the cultural heritage of Nepal is rich and representative of its diverse citizens. Its dance, music, art, folklore, literature and food are also influenced by Indian, Mongolian and Tibetan culture.

Bhutan, the land of the Thunder Dragon. A mesmerising place in the clouds, with lush valleys, tiered rice paddy fields, rich forests and rushing rivers. A place that measures the success of the country, not on outputs or financials, but on the Gross National Happiness of the people who live there. A trip to Bhutan is an eye-opening, life changing experience.  

So often it’s wealth that defines whether a country is deemed “successful” or not, but in Bhutan, the government is guided by the philosophy of Gross National Happiness. The concept of measuring the happiness and well-being of citizens was brought to the fore by former king Jigme Singye Wangchuck in 1972. He is reported to have said: “Gross National Happiness is more important than Gross National Product.”